Elizabethan Witchcraft and Witches

Visit this site dedicated to providing information about Elizabethan Witchcraft and Witches.Fast and accurate details and facts about the history of Elizabethan Witchcraft and Witches.Learn the facts about Elizabethan Witchcraft and Witches.

Source: Elizabethan Witchcraft and Witches

Advertisements

Look Out World…I am WOMAN: Hear Me Make Whatever Sound a Shrew Makes…

As this week leisurely comes to a close, I find myself becoming impatient.  Why?  Because next weekend I get to go to a Renaissance Festival, of course!  Lady Cornelia and I will be exploring the Central Missouri Renaissance Festival in the realm of Kingdom City next weekend, and I can’t wait!  I find that I’ve had “Renaissance-on-the-brain” a bit lately, and just today I began to ponder:  how would I have fit in during the Renaissance?  Would there have been a place for me?  It’s the same question that came to mind as I read/watched Outlander; if I were truly able to go back in time, would I be able to blend in as well as Claire and Geillis (sorry…spoiler alert?!?)?  Of course I know that this isn’t terribly likely, but since when does plausibility enter into daydreaming?

There are, of course, many aspects to consider.  A woman’s behavioral education would have begun in the cradle, and the world was a far different place.  More years ago now than I care to admit, I recall writing a paper for a history class on the Renaissance and Reformation entitled “Missionary: The Position of Women in the Renaissance.”  The title is about all I can remember about the paper, mostly because my suspicion is that it was, indeed, the BEST part.  Regardless, the facts are plain:  women simply did not figure into most aspects of the Renaissance.  Silence was golden, afterall.

I am not particularly adept at silence most of the time.  It comes in fits and starts, however.  Once in high school I stayed absolutely silent for several hours just to see if I could, but that’s a rarity.  Besides, voluntary silence is far different than effectively having your voice taken from you as most women in the Renaissance would have.  A lady always left the speaking to her Lord (or closest male relative).  Unless, of course, she was a shrew.

After much consideration, I think I would have been a shrew (no, not the venomous little mammal….  Instead, think of an unruly woman who speaks her mind and doesn’t obey–as in Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew).  I think a lot and have copious opinions on all sorts of subjects…few of which stay sequestered within.  You will know what I think (whether you want to or not).  I also have a minor problem with the whole obedience issue.  Telling me what to do doesn’t go over well.  In fact, telling me what to do is the quickest way to insure that I won’t do it.  Try to tame me all you like, but I’m also incredibly stubborn.  I think there must have been many women like me during the Renaissance, though.  Intelligent, spirited, independently thinking women who would not allow themselves to be silenced.  Hear me, world:  I am a shrew, and I wear that title proudly.